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", Selected Poems of Gray and Collins (1967) p. 44, cites Swift's Thoughts on Various Subjects (Works (1735) vol i): 'There is in most people a reluctance and unwillingness to be forgotten. We observe even among the vulgar, how fond they are to have an inscription over their grave. It requires but little philosophy to discover and observe that there is no intrinsic value in all this; however, if it be founded in our nature, as an incitement to virtue, it ought not to be ridiculed.'"

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"Gray probably took this expression from ''Paradise Lost,'' iii. 88, the only place in Milton's poems where ''precincts'' occurs: - ''Not far off Heaven, in the precincts of light.''"

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", Selected Poems of Gray and Collins (1967) p. 44, cites Swift's Thoughts on Various Subjects (Works (1735) vol i): 'There is in most people a reluctance and unwillingness to be forgotten. We observe even among the vulgar, how fond they are to have an inscription over their grave. It requires but little philosophy to discover and observe that there is no intrinsic value in all this; however, if it be founded in our nature, as an incitement to virtue, it ought not to be ridiculed.'"

"'And to suppress reluctant Conscience strive', Blackmore, Poems (1718) p. 295."
06/01/2014 · Expert Reviewed. How to Quote and Cite a Poem in an Essay Using MLA Format. Three Parts: Quoting from Poems in an Essay Citing Poems in an Essay …

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"The evening bell still conventionally called curfew, though the law of the Conqueror, which gave it the name, had long been a dead letter. In Shakespeare the sound of the Curfew is the signal to the spirit-world to be at large. Edgar in Lear feigns to recognize 'the foul fiend Flibbertigibbet: he begins at curfew and walks till the first cock' (III. 4. 103); and in The Tempest, V. i. 40, the elves 'rejoice to hear the solemn curfew.' The mood of the Elegy is that of Il Penseroso and the scene in both poems is viewed in the evening twilight:

''Oft on a plat of rising ground
I hear the far-off curfew sound,
Over some wide-watered shore,
Swinging slow with sullen roar.''
Milton, Il Penseroso, 72-75.
Milton's 'far-off curfew' reminds us of the squilla di lontano of Dante, which Gray quotes for the first line of the Elegy. I supply in brackets the rest of the passage; Purgatorio, VIII. 1-6.
[Era gia l' ora, che volge 'l disio
A' naviganti, e 'ntenerisce 'l cuore
Lo di ch' han detto a' dolci amici addio:
E che lo nuovo peregrin d' amore
Punge, se ode] squilla di lontano
Che paia 'l giorno pianger, che si muore.
[Now was the hour that wakens fond desire
In men at sea, and melts their thoughtful heart
Who in the morn have bid sweet friends farewell,
And pilgrim, newly on the road, with love
Thrills, if he hear] the vesper bell from far
That seems to mourn for the expiring day. Cary.
The curfew tolls from Great S. Mary's, at Cambridge, at 9, from the Curfew Tower of Windsor Castle (nearer the scene of the Elegy) at 8, in the evening.
Warton, Notes on Pope, vol. i. p. 82, reads:
''The curfew tolls! - the knell of parting day.''
But we know exactly what Gray wrote, and what he meant us to read."

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Poets' Corner - Alexander Pope - Essay on Man

", Selected Poems of Gray and Collins (1967) p. 44, cites Swift's Thoughts on Various Subjects (Works (1735) vol i): 'There is in most people a reluctance and unwillingness to be forgotten. We observe even among the vulgar, how fond they are to have an inscription over their grave. It requires but little philosophy to discover and observe that there is no intrinsic value in all this; however, if it be founded in our nature, as an incitement to virtue, it ought not to be ridiculed.'"

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Essay Option 1: Compare/Contrast Essay

"This is Gray's reading in his MSS. and in the editions published by him; but almost all editors follow Mason and Mitford and read await. Scott of Amwell in his ''Critical Essay'' on the ''Elegy,'' published in 1785, writes in a footnote: ''It should be await, the plural, for it includes a number of circumstances.'' I have traced await back to the appearance of the ''Elegy'' in Dodsley's ''Collection of Poems,'' i.e., in Volume IV. published in 1755. But as in the editions of the ''Elegy'' in 1753, ''corrected by the author,'' and in his last edition, 1768, Gray prints awaits, it is clear that he intended it to be so retained; besides, it is better to take ''inevitable hour'' as the subject of ''awaits,'' and not ''boast,'' ''pomp,'' etc.; as not only is this inversion more in Gray's manner, but also the statement that the inevitable hour of death is waiting for the great, the beautiful and the wealthy, like the ''whirlwind's sway, / That hushed in grim repose expects his evening prey.'' Also see ''Epitaph on Mrs. Clarke,'' ; and ''Shakespeare Verses,'' 8."