Locke, John | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Our Old Testament survey courses are encompassing the entire 39 books as presented within the King James Version of the Holy Bible. Text location and word search is an integral component of each per credit course of study as well as essay summary and personal application where indicated.

John Locke′s Second Treatise on Government

A Essay Concerning the true original, extent, and end of Civil Government; by John Locke

His objective was an accurate rendering of Mr

Our Old Testament survey courses are encompassing the entire 39 books as presented within the King James Version of the Holy Bible. Text location and word search is an integral component of each per credit course of study as well as essay summary and personal application where indicated.

One Lord, One Faith… No Water Baptism

Our Old Testament survey courses are encompassing the entire 39 books as presented within the King James Version of the Holy Bible. Text location and word search is an integral component of each per credit course of study as well as essay summary and personal application where indicated.

This translation of The Law was done by Dean Russell of The Foundation staff

04/05/2012 · Dear W as Post

But this privilege, belonging only to the king′s person, hinders not but they may be questioned, opposed, and resisted, who use unjust force, though they pretend a commission from him which the law authorises not; as is plain in the case of him that has the king′s writ to arrest a man which is a full commission from the king, and yet he that has it cannot break open a man′s house to do it, nor execute this command of the king upon certain days nor in certain places, though this commission have no such exception in it; but they are the limitations of the law, which, if any one transgress, the king′s commission excuses him not.

The Grace and Mercy of God - Gospel Way

King James, in his speech to the Parliament, 16O3, tells them thus: "I will ever prefer the weal of the public and of the whole commonwealth, in making of good laws and constitutions, to any particular and private ends of mine, thinking ever the wealth and weal of the commonwealth to be my greatest weal and worldly felicity- a point wherein a lawful king doth directly differ from a tyrant; for I do acknowledge that the special and greatest point of difference that is between a rightful king and an usurping tyrant is this- that whereas the proud and ambitious tyrant doth think his kingdom and people are only ordained for satisfaction of his desires and unreasonable appetites, the righteous and just king doth, by the contrary, acknowledge himself to be ordained for the procuring of the wealth and property of his people." And again, in his speech to the Parliament, 1609, he hath these words: "The king binds himself, by a double oath, to the observation of the fundamental laws of his kingdom- tacitly, as by being a king, and so bound to protect, as well the people as the laws of his kingdom; and expressly by his oath at his coronation; so as every just king, in a settled kingdom, is bound to observe that paction made to his people, by his laws, in framing his government agreeable thereunto, according to that paction which God made with Noah after the deluge: ′Hereafter, seed-time, and harvest, and cold, and heat, and summer, and winter, and day, and night, shall not cease while the earth remaineth.′ And therefore a king, governing in a settled kingdom, leaves to be a king, and degenerates into a tyrant, as soon as he leaves off to rule according to his laws." And a little after: "Therefore, all kings that are not tyrants, or perjured, will be glad to bound themselves within the limits of their laws, and they that persuade them the contrary are vipers, pests, both against them and the commonwealth." Thus, that learned king, who well understood the notions of things, makes the difference betwixt a king and a tyrant to consist only in this: that one makes the laws the bounds of his power and the good of the public the end of his government; the other makes all give way to his own will and appetite.201.

Natural law and natural rights follow from the nature of man and the world

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THE majority having, as has been showed, upon men′s first uniting into society, the whole power of the community naturally in them, may employ all that power in making laws for the community from time to time, and executing those laws by officers of their own appointing, and then the form of the government is a perfect democracy; or else may put the power of making laws into the hands of a few select men, and their heirs or successors, and then it is an oligarchy; or else into the hands of one man, and then it is a monarchy; if to him and his heirs, it is a hereditary monarchy; if to him only for life, but upon his death the power only of nominating a successor, to return to them, an elective monarchy.

10/02/2018 · The Holy Bible: King James Version. Isaiah 30

The Trial of Jesus: Authentic Historical Account

To understand political power aright, and derive it from its original, we must consider what estate all men are naturally in, and that is, a state of perfect freedom to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of Nature, without asking leave or depending upon the will of any other man.A state also of equality, wherein all the power and jurisdiction is reciprocal, no one having more than another, there being nothing more evident than that creatures of the same species and rank, promiscuously born to all the same advantages of Nature, and the use of the same faculties, should also be equal one amongst another, without subordination or subjection, unless the lord and master of them all should, by any manifest declaration of his will, set one above another, and confer on him, by an evident and clear appointment, an undoubted right to dominion and sovereignty.5.

Torah sheba'al Peh - The Oral Torah and Jewish Tradition

The Holy Bible: King James Version

For the king′s authority being given him only by the law, he cannot empower any one to act against the law, or justify him by his commission in so doing.