Shakespeare's Hamlet Act 1 Scene 2 - Hamlet First Appears


OPHELIA
This part of the quote also relates to later on in Act 3, Scene 1, lines 121-122, when Hamlet addresses Ophelia: “Why wouldst thou be a breeder of sinners?” The sun relates to Hamlet Senior, who has often been compared with Hyperion, the sun god, for being a war-like king.

We know this because in Act 1 Scene 2, Hamlet says “Heaven and earth!

 Shakespeare, William.

Hamlet: Soliloquy Act 1 Scene 2 ..

Let her not walk i’ the sun: conception is a blessing; but as your daughter may conceive, friend, look to ‘t.”- Hamlet (Act 2, Scene 2, lines 181-185)
Hamlet’s use of the imagery of a decomposing dead dog is a metaphor to the rotting state of Denmark and the corrupt goings-on.
Shakespeare tries to show that the sun, just like King Claudius, can spread corruption.

Act 1, Scene 1 | Hamlet | William Shakespeare | Lit2Go ETC

The importance of the sun can be seen when Claudius asks, “How is it that the clouds still hang on you?” Hamlet replies, “Not so, my lord; I am too much in the sun” (Act 1, Scene 2, Line 67).

William Shakespeare, "Act 1, Scene 1," Hamlet, Lit2Go Edition, (0), accessed March 03, 2018, .
Next: Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3 _____ Explanatory Notes for Act 1, Scene 2 From Hamlet, prince of Denmark. Ed. K. Deighton. London: Macmillan.

SparkNotes: Hamlet: Act I, scene i

Next: Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1 _____ Explanatory Notes for Act 2, Scene 2. From Hamlet, prince of Denmark. Ed. K. Deighton. London: Macmillan.

Hamlet Act 2 Summary and Analysis | GradeSaver

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